What does Taliban mean in English

What does Taliban mean?

 English meaning of Afghanistan militant group’s name explained, and how it started The word Taliban means ‘students’ or ‘seekers’ in Pashto, one of the two official languages of Afghanistan By David HughesAugust 23, 2021 3:58 pm(Updated August 23, 2021 4:13 pm)The Taliban’s rapid surge to power in Afghanistan has sparked alarm in the West and widespread fear from Afghans at the prospect of a return to the group’s brutal previous regime.Officials declared a new “Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan” after seizing Kabul on August 15, the culmination of a lightning campaign in the wake of the U.S. withdrawal troops from the country. It is almost exactly 25 years since the Taliban seized power in Afghanistan for the first time – here are the origins of the group and what its name means. Aims of Islamist militant group in Afghanistan explained after they claim Kabul What does ‘Taliban’ mean?The Taliban was formed in the early 1990s by Afghan mujahideen, or Muslim guerrilla fighters, who had resisted the Soviet invasion and occupation of Afghanistan between 1979-89. Its name comes from the plural of the word “talib” in Pashto, one of the two official languages of Afghanistan. This translates literally as “students” or “seekers”, and refers to the group’s founding membership, which largely consisted of religious students who had been educated in traditional Islamic schools. It is thought that the group first emerged in religious seminaries preaching hardline Sunni Islam, paid for with money from Saudi Arabia, according to the BBC. Towards the end of the Cold War, the U.S. had spent millions of of dollars supplying Afghan schoolchildren with with textbooks filled with militant Islamic teachings in a covert attempt to foment opposition to the Soviet occupation, the Washington Post reports. The Taliban secured control of Kabul after a lightning campaign.

See also  Who is funding the Taliban now

When did the Taliban rule Afghanistan?

Early Taliban fighters were backed by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and Pakistan’s military intelligence agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), according to foreign policy think-tank Council on Foreign Relations. They were joined by Pashtun tribesmen, the predominant ethnic group in much of the country’s south and east, who studied in Pakistani madrassas (Islamic religious schools). The Taliban quickly extending its influence throughout Afghanistan following the withdrawal of Soviet troops and the collapse of the country’s communist regime and it captured Kabul in 1996. The regime was then toppled from power by a US-led invasion for providing refuge to al-Qaeda and Osama bin Laden, the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks. During its ruling period, the Taliban imposed its own strict version of sharia law, introducing punishments such as public executions for those convicted of murder or adultery and amputation for those found guilty of theft.After the 2001 invasion, Taliban leaders were forced to retreat from Afghanistan’s main regions, but continued a guerrilla war against the US-led coalition in the country for the next 20 years. Topics Afghanistan Taliban More from News World Britons in Spain face life without cars or family care after failure of post-Brexit talksNews1.5m will struggle to pay bills, says think tank calling for one-off £250 payments for poorest News Vardy texted agent to leak story on celebrity cheating with footballer, Wagatha trial hears Politics Private e-scooters will be legalised on U.K. roads but vehicles must have speed limits Politics Tory M.P. claims people who use food banks don’t know how to budget or ‘cook a meal from scratch’News The route for the Platinum Jubilee flypast and how to watch it live Editor’s Picks News Analysis The Irish border is a political trip wire, yet the Government has been cavalier in its approach Opinion Jackie Weaver: You think my council meeting was heated? New’ street votes’ could be much worse News Exclusive Shortages of blood pressure pills and painkillers loom for NHS amid supply chain crisis Most Popular Politics Every single one of the 38 new laws in the Queen’s speech, and what they would mean for for you Politics Tory M.P. claims people who use food banks don’t know how to budget or ‘cook a meal from scratch ‘Opinion Threatening to break the Northern Ireland Protocol plays straight into Putin’s hands World Britons in Spain face life without cars or family care after failure of post-Brexit talks News The route for the Platinum Jubilee flypast and how to watch it live Politics Private e-scooters will be legalised on U.K. roads but vehicles must have speed limits Politics Tory divisions over cost of living as M.P.s fight over tax and ministers pray for lower gas price News Vardy texted agent to leak story on celebrity cheating with footballer, Wagatha trial hears Opinion What is trans conversion therapy?

See also  Are Afghans Arab

Who funds Taliban in Afghanistan?


Foreign donations are a major source of income. According to Afghanistan’s Center for Research and Policy Studies, the Taliban received between $150 million to $200 million annually  from private citizens and charitable foundations in the Gulf countries. Nearly $60 million was funnelled through the Haqqani Network annually.

Where do Taliban get weapons from?


For years, the Taliban have been acquiring U.S. weapons, relying on corrupt Afghan officials and troops selling U.S. equipment, capturing weapons in battle or stealing them in raids. The sudden collapse of the Afghan army provided a uniquely large windfall.

What is Afghanistan’s main export?


In Afghanistan, exports account for around 20 percent of GDP. Afghanistan main exports are: carpets and rugs (45 percent of total exports); dried fruits (31 percent) and medicinal plants (12 percent). Main export partners are: Pakistan (48 percent of total exports), India (19 percent) and Russia (9 percent). Others include: Iran, Iraq and Turkey.